​Why should Chinese tell western political leaders not to meet the Dalai Lama? 

Chris Patten: A craven Britain has demeaned itself with China, Brexit will make it worse

Hong Kong’s last governor is ‘astonished’ at Britain’s behaviour and says it must be firmer as it searches for a post-EU trade relationship

The British government’s “kowtowing” to China on issues including human rights and Hong Kong’s quest for democracy will become increasingly craven following the UK’s departure from the European Union, the former colony’s last governor has warned.

In an interview with the Guardian marking the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese control, on 1 July 1997, Lord Patten attacked what he called London’s repeated failure to challenge Beijing over its erosion of the territory’s freedoms and autonomy. 

The Conservative peer said a sequence of “outrageous breaches” of the Sino-British handover agreement – including the alleged abduction of a group of political booksellers– had prompted little more than “a slightly embarrassed clearing of the throat” and some “tut-tutting” from Downing Street. 

“On the whole, we have continued to operate under the delusion that unless you bow low enough you will never do any business in China,” Chris Patten said. 

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“Why should the Chinese tell … a western political leader whether or not he or she can meet the Dalai Lama? …” Chris Patten: A craven Britain has demeaned itself with China, Brexit will make it worse

 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/28/chris-lord-patten-craven-britain-demeaned-china-brexit-craven-worse?CMP=share_btn_tw

Chris Patten: A craven Britain has demeaned itself with China, Brexit will make it worse

Hong Kong’s last governor is ‘astonished’ at Britain’s behaviour and says it must be firmer as it searches for a post-EU trade relationship

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The British government’s “kowtowing” to China on issues including human rights and Hong Kong’s quest for democracy will become increasingly craven following the UK’s departure from the European Union, the former colony’s last governor has warned.

In an interview with the Guardian marking the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese control, on 1 July 1997, Lord Patten attacked what he called London’s repeated failure to challenge Beijing over its erosion of the territory’s freedoms and autonomy. 

The Conservative peer said a sequence of “outrageous breaches” of the Sino-British handover agreement – including the alleged abduction of a group of political booksellers– had prompted little more than “a slightly embarrassed clearing of the throat” and some “tut-tutting” from Downing Street. 

“On the whole, we have continued to operate under the delusion that unless you bow low enough you will never do any business in China,” Chris Patten said. 

Nets in the Sky, Traps on the GroundTibet: A Glossary of Repression

Chinese authorities are increasingly using opaque policy terms in official media to tighten repression in Tibet, Human Rights Watch said in an illustrated glossary released today.

Tibet: A Glossary of Repression explains and illustrates a dozen terms that appear benign or even positive but are in fact used to ensure total compliance and surveillance by officials of ordinary Tibetan people. The glossary includes terms that relate to political and social control, such as “comprehensive rectification,” “no cracks, no shadows, no gaps left,” and “every village a fortress, everyone a watchman.”

Chinese authorities are increasingly using opaque policy terms in official media to tighten repression in Tibet

Nets in the Sky, Traps on the Ground

Tibetan: gnam rgya sa rnyi གནམ་རྒྱ་ས་རྙི།

Chinese: tiānluó dìwǎng 天罗地网

https://www.hrw.org/video-photos/interactive/2017/06/20/tibet-glossary-repression

First appeared: in a play by an anonymous author from the Yuan era (1261-1368), in which a character says “Celestialsoldiers, set up nets in the sky and traps on the ground, don’t let demons slip away!” Revived in various forms in the Communist era, both before and since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

Example of usage:

  • The key to upholding social harmony and stability is people. The autonomous regional Party committee and government have all along concentrated on integrating experts and people, vigorously implementing mass prevention and mass control, relying on the masses, mobilizing the masses, and fully bringing into play the roles of ‘factory care teams, school care teams, village care teams,’ and red arm-band teams, leading all areas of society to actively participate in constructing ‘peace work units,’ and further building nets in the sky, traps on the ground, and copper ramparts and iron walls for upholding social stability.[28]

Variant usage: the phrase “nets spread from the earth to the sky” was used by Mao Zedong in his On Protracted War in 1938 and revived by Xi Jinping in a speech on crushing “terrorism” at the 2nd Xinjiang Work Conference in May 2014. The term “Skynet” (tianwang) is used for China’s video surveillance system, and for the drive by China’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection since April 2015 to repatriate high-profile corruption suspects