​Why should Chinese tell western political leaders not to meet the Dalai Lama? 

Chris Patten: A craven Britain has demeaned itself with China, Brexit will make it worse

Hong Kong’s last governor is ‘astonished’ at Britain’s behaviour and says it must be firmer as it searches for a post-EU trade relationship

The British government’s “kowtowing” to China on issues including human rights and Hong Kong’s quest for democracy will become increasingly craven following the UK’s departure from the European Union, the former colony’s last governor has warned.

In an interview with the Guardian marking the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese control, on 1 July 1997, Lord Patten attacked what he called London’s repeated failure to challenge Beijing over its erosion of the territory’s freedoms and autonomy. 

The Conservative peer said a sequence of “outrageous breaches” of the Sino-British handover agreement – including the alleged abduction of a group of political booksellers– had prompted little more than “a slightly embarrassed clearing of the throat” and some “tut-tutting” from Downing Street. 

“On the whole, we have continued to operate under the delusion that unless you bow low enough you will never do any business in China,” Chris Patten said. 

“Why should the Chinese tell … a western political leader whether or not he or she can meet the Dalai Lama? …” Chris Patten: A craven Britain has demeaned itself with China, Brexit will make it worse

 https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/jun/28/chris-lord-patten-craven-britain-demeaned-china-brexit-craven-worse?CMP=share_btn_tw

Chris Patten: A craven Britain has demeaned itself with China, Brexit will make it worse

Hong Kong’s last governor is ‘astonished’ at Britain’s behaviour and says it must be firmer as it searches for a post-EU trade relationship

Shares

179


Comments


494

The British government’s “kowtowing” to China on issues including human rights and Hong Kong’s quest for democracy will become increasingly craven following the UK’s departure from the European Union, the former colony’s last governor has warned.

In an interview with the Guardian marking the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to Chinese control, on 1 July 1997, Lord Patten attacked what he called London’s repeated failure to challenge Beijing over its erosion of the territory’s freedoms and autonomy. 

The Conservative peer said a sequence of “outrageous breaches” of the Sino-British handover agreement – including the alleged abduction of a group of political booksellers– had prompted little more than “a slightly embarrassed clearing of the throat” and some “tut-tutting” from Downing Street. 

“On the whole, we have continued to operate under the delusion that unless you bow low enough you will never do any business in China,” Chris Patten said.